In Fine Style

 

In Fine Style

Like many textile artists I find enjoyment and inspiration in a diverse range of creative expression including music and graphic illustration. Today I popped into the Victoria and Albert Museum to attend a talk, part of their Art and Existence: African and Asian Diaspora Explored series. These talks feature leading external practitioners and are organised by a wonderful lady Janet Browne, Programme Manager Black Heritage and Culture within the V&A’s Learning Department. Contact Janet at the V & A if you want to be added to her mailing list for future events.

Todays speakers were cultural practitioners Christopher Bateman and Al’ Fingers Newman. Their talk was a celebration of the work of Jamaican newspaper cartoonist Wilfred Limonious, (1949-1999).

In the early 1980s Jamaica gave birth to a new musical style called Dancehall. With its origins in the political turbulence of the late 1970s it became the dominant and powerful musical expression and social commentary of the 1980s and ’90s. “This multimodal African diasporic style is also evident in North American hip-hop and the origins of both can be traced to West African performance modes”. (1)

Graphic designer Wilfred Limonious became one of the primary visual architects of this movement.

What an enjoyable way to spend a sunny London afternoon, the talk included music, photographs and some of Wilfred’s illustrated record sleeves and his vibrant cartoons often featuring voluptuous ladies with very slim men and humorous captions. In Jamaica humour is widely used as a mechanism for dealing with hardship. The talk is accompanied by a touring exhibition and coffee table book In Fine Style: the Dancehall Art of Wilfred Limonious. You can catch the exhibition at the Tabernacle, 35 Powis Square, off Portobello Road, London W11 2AY until Sunday 29th May 2016. The book is out on 16 August 2016 published by One Love Books. I’m pleased to say the talk and exhibition will be touring Jamaica in the future. 

(1) Professor Carolyn Cooper’s Encyclopaedia Britannica entry for Dancehall Music

 

 

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